Welcome to Skeptics in the Pub, Sheffield. Skeptics in the Pub is about getting people together to have a relaxed and enjoyable evening while listening to talks given in a friendly manner on a wide range of topics.

The talks usually start at 7.30pm (doors open at 7pm - press the buzzer to be let in) and we hold them at the Farm Road Sports & Social Club.

To find out more about us please read the About Us page. And if you're not sure what a skeptic is then cast your eyes over the What's a Skeptic page.

The events are free though we do ask for a £3 donation to cover the speakers expenses and other costs.

All upcoming events are listed below and the meetings are open to all whatever your beliefs and views so please, come along.

You can also join our Facebook group here and follow our Twitter feed. We also have a Meetup page here.

Any help you can give us in spreading the word is greatly appreciated.

Martin Graff

When?
Monday, November 27 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Martin Graff

What's the talk about?

There is much evidence that being in a good relationship can be beneficial to our health, happiness and general well-being. However, should we resort to online dating in the pursuit of a happy relationship? Psychological research would seem to suggest that online dating may not be the easy answer.

This talk focuses on the reasons why we should be cautious in our online dating pursuits. For example, people make bad decisions in online dating. Furthermore, those we contact are often not what they appear to be. Additionally, there is no evidence that the algorithms employed by dating sites and which purport to match us with a desirable partner actually work in reality. Finally, this talk will conclude with some information on how to maximize our chances in an online dating environment.

Dr Martin Graff is Reader in Psychology at the University of South Wales, UK, an associate fellow of the British Psychological Society and a Chartered Psychologist. He has researched cognitive processes in web-based learning, the formation and dissolution of romantic relationships online and offline, online persuasion and disinhibition. He has written over 50  scientific  articles,  published  widely  in  the  field  of  Internet  behaviour,  and presented his work at numerous International Conferences. He writes for Psychology Today magazine and regularly speaks at events in the UK and Internationally.

Karen Douglas

When?
Monday, December 18 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Karen Douglas

What's the talk about?

NOTE: This event is on the 3rd Monday in December because there's apparently something happening on the 25th...

Was 9/11 an inside job? Is climate change a hoax? Was Princess Diana murdered? Millions of people appear to think so, disbelieving official explanations for significant events in favour of alternative accounts that are often called ‘conspiracy theories’. In recent years, psychologists have begun to investigate what makes conspiracy theories appealing to so many people. In this talk, Prof. Karen Douglas will broadly overview what psychologists have found out so far, and will discuss some of her own findings on the causes and consequences of belief in conspiracy theories.

Karen Douglas is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent. In addition to conducting work on the psychology of conspiracy theories, she is involved in projects examining sexism in language, the influence of sexist ideology on attitudes toward pregnant women, and the psychology of internet behaviour.

Nasrin Nasr

When?
Monday, January 22 2018 at 7:30PM

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Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Nasrin Nasr

What's the talk about?

Nasrin conducts interdisciplinary research to design, develop and evaluate health technologies and health services for long-term conditions. This type of research involves working with researchers and professionals from a range of backgrounds and disciplines as well as involvement of patients and their families. Patients are expert and active participants in their own health who have knowledge and practical skills borne out of their experiences of living with a long-term condition.

Nasrin uses Narrative inquiry to create life stories. Knowledge grounded in personal life stories enriches our understanding of the impact of long-term conditions on people’s lives and subsequently informs the design of interventions and provision of health services. In this talk, she uses a few published examples to elaborate on this research methodology.

Dr Nasrin Nasr: (Research Fellow, ScHARR, University of Sheffield). Nasrin is a physiotherapist by background and has a DPhil in Health and Social Sciences. Her main research interest and experience is examining the narrative of change demonstrating how people redefine their life stories during the trajectory of a long-term condition. Overall, her research involves the development and evaluation of complex health interventions with focus on health care technologies. She has 10 years post-doctoral research experience in the area of technology design and development where she has applied a hybrid of qualitative and User-centred design methods to design, develop and evaluate home-based assistive technologies for the self-management of long-term conditions. She also applies innovative evaluation methods for complex health and social settings to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions as well as to explore how, why and in what circumstances the interventions work. Nasrin’s other roles includes Module lead for ‘Complex Evaluation Methods’ (Masters in Clinical Research); lead for Short Courses: Real World Evaluation, and Experiential Research Approaches (ERA): (ScHARR)

Katie Steckles

When?
Monday, February 26 2018 at 7:30PM

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Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Katie Steckles

What's the talk about?

We all know that people with maths, science and technology skills are experienced at problem-solving. But how useful are those skills in the real world? Mathematician and speaker Katie Steckles will show you some mathematical, logical and geometrical tricks to solve some of everyday life’s minor challenges – from tying your shoelace to changing a duvet cover, and plenty of others. You’ll never fold a t-shirt the same way again!

Katie Steckles is a mathematician based in Manchester, who gives talks and workshops on different areas of maths. She finished her PhD in 2011, and since then has talked about maths in schools, at science festivals, on BBC radio, at music festivals, as part of theatre shows and on the internet. She enjoys doing puzzles, solving the Rubik’s cube and baking things shaped like maths. In 2016, Katie was awarded the Joshua Phillips Award for Innovation in Science Engagement.

www.katiesteckles.co.uk

Anthony Warner

When?
Monday, June 25 2018 at 7:30PM

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Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Anthony Warner

What's the talk about?

Anthony Warner somehow managed to complete a Biochemistry Degree at Manchester University before deeply disappointing his parents by deciding that the heat of the professional kitchen was the career for him. After ten years in restaurants, hotels and events-catering he became a development chef in the food manufacturing industry and has spent the last 11 years working on some of the UK’s best-known brands and products.

In 2016, driven by frustration at the clearly unscientific messages being spewed out by a new breed of healthy eating celebrities, he started the Angry Chef blog, intended to appeal to a few similarly frustrated food industry professionals. Despite frequent attempts to alienate his readers, the blog has grown in popularity, forcing a middle-aged man to reluctantly engage with social media. Terrified at the prospect of being described as a ‘food-blogger’, Anthony has tried in vain to keep Angry Chef anonymous, but has sadly failed to do so as newspapers and magazines continue to approach him in the hope he might say something controversial about Jamie Oliver.

He now writes regularly for New Scientist, The Pool and the Sunday Times, and his first book, The Angry Chef - Bad Science and the Truth about Healthy Eating was published by Oneworld in July. He has appeared on Inside Science, The Food Programme and was once asked if he would be happy to eat his own dog on The Moral Maze.

Anthony does not have a food philosophy. He is a pretty decent cook, but is not an expert in anything. He is merely curious and determined to get to the truth. He loves food, loves science and is ambivalent about Marmite. He lives in the Nottinghamshire countryside with his wife, daughter and a slightly unbalanced Springer Spaniel.

George Thomas

When?
Monday, July 23 2018 at 7:30PM

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(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
George Thomas

What's the talk about?

George will talk about the identification, prevalence and presentation of autism illustrated by stories from his own experience. We can consider the controversies: deficient or different? Nature or nurture? We will look at successful people with autism and consider what life is like for many.

George worked in autism education between the years of 1996 and 2016. He has worked in schools and with Local Authorities in an advisory capacity within Leicester City and Leicestershire, representing the interests of parent and children with autism in many different forums and in schools around the country. Towards the close of his work with Leicestershire LA, George became interested in developing provision for children who were either excluded from school or unable to attend by virtue of their anxiety. He set up an ‘education otherwise than at school’ programme to help the authority meet its responsibilities to this vulnerable group. Since 2001, George has been a Regional Tutor on the autism courses provided by the University of Birmingham. In 2013 he retired from his post as Service manager of Leicestershire’s Autism Outreach Service to develop his own consultancy providing training in Autism throughout the country.