Have a gander at our past events...

Previous year >>

Rotting corpses, and what we can learn from them

Anna Williams

When?
Monday, January 21 2019 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Anna Williams

What's the talk about?

This highly illustrated talk (graphic images) describes the unique outdoor forensic laboratories known colloquially as 'Body Farms' in the USA and Australia, and discusses how the research that has been conducted at them has helped criminal investigations. It details how there isn't a similar facility in the UK or Europe, and explores the reasons for and against them, and discusses public opinion towards them, in order to stimulate healthy debate. 

Dr Anna Williams is Principal Enterprise Fellow in Forensic Anthropology at the University of Huddersfield. She read Archaeology and Anthropology at Oxford University, and specialised in Forensic Anthropology through a Masters, PhD and lots of casework. She's an expert in forensic osteology (bones) and decomposition. She has appeared on TV and radio discussing anthropology and forensic science. She was a 2014 British Science Association Media Fellow for New Scientist.

You can find out more about Dr Anna Williams and body farms below:

Twitter: @Bonegella and @HTF_4_UK

Website: http://htf4uk.blogspot.com/

Nasrin Nasr

When?
Monday, December 17 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Nasrin Nasr

What's the talk about?

NOTE: THIS IS ON THE 3RD MONDAY OF THE MONTH NOT THE USUAL 4TH MONDAY.

Nasrin conducts interdisciplinary research to design, develop and evaluate health technologies and health services for long-term conditions. This type of research involves working with researchers and professionals from a range of backgrounds and disciplines as well as involvement of patients and their families.

Patients are expert and active participants in their own health who have knowledge and practical skills borne out of their experiences of living with a long-term condition. Nasrin uses Narrative inquiry to create life stories. Knowledge grounded in personal life stories enriches our understanding of the impact of long-term conditions on people’s lives and subsequently informs the design of interventions and provision of health services. In this talk, Nasrin will use a few published examples to elaborate on this research methodology.

Dr Nasrin Nasr: (Research Fellow, ScHARR, University of Sheffield). Nasrin is a physiotherapist by background and has a DPhil in Health and Social Sciences. Her main research interest and experience is examining the narrative of change demonstrating how people redefine their life stories during the trajectory of a long-term condition. Overall, her research involves the development and evaluation of complex health interventions with focus on health care technologies. She has 10 years post-doctoral research experience in the area of technology design and development where she has applied a hybrid of qualitative and User-centred design methods to design, develop and evaluate home-based assistive technologies for the self-management of long-term conditions. She also applies innovative evaluation methods for complex health and social settings to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions as well as to explore how, why and in what circumstances the interventions work.

Nasrin’s other roles includes Module lead for ‘Complex Evaluation Methods’ (Masters in Clinical Research); lead for Short Courses: Real World Evaluation, and Experiential Research Approaches (ERA): (ScHARR)

Chris French

When?
Friday, December 14 2018 at 7:00PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Charles Street
12.0.06
Sheffield

Who?
Chris French

What's the talk about?

NOTE: This is being held in co-operation with Sheffield Hallam Student's Humanist Society and is in addition to our normal talk in December.

ALSO NOTE: The venue for this event is at the University - the Dorothy Fleming Lecture Theatre and starts at 7pm.

Professor Chris French, Goldsmiths University will give a talk on the psychology of ghosts and hauntings.

Opinion polls repeatedly show relatively high levels of belief in ghosts even in modern Western societies. Furthermore, a sizeable minority of the population claim to have personally encountered a ghost. This talk will consider a number of factors that may lead people to claim that they have experienced a ghost even though they may not in fact have done so. Topics covered will include hoaxes, sincere misinterpretation of natural phenomena, hallucinatory experiences and pareidolia (seeing things that are not there), the fallibility of eyewitness testimony, the possible role of complex electromagnetic fields and infrasound, photographic evidence, EVP, and the role of the media.

Agata Debowska

When?
Monday, November 26 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Agata Debowska

What's the talk about?

Psychopathy is one of the oldest known mental disorders. Although the concept of psychopathy is of interest to many researchers and practitioners, an agreed definition of the disorder does not exist. More specifically, as long as researchers tend to agree that psychopaths are characterised by callous affect, lack of empathy, and manipulativeness, the inclusion of criminal and antisocial behaviour as a fundamental component of the disorder is highly controversial. In this talk, Dr Agata Debowska will discuss the concept of psychopathy, introduce the newly developed Psychopathic Personality Traits Model (PPTM), and present some of her research findings on measuring and profiling psychopathic traits among forensic and non-forensic populations.

Dr Agata Debowska is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her current research interests and publications focus predominantly on child abuse and neglect, gender-based violence, psychopathy, criminal social identity, and prisonization. She has published extensively and presented her research findings at international public lectures and conferences. Agata is an Associate Editor in Frontiers in Psychology (Forensic and Legal Psychology section) and a member of the None in Three (Ni3) Research Centre.

Tony Harcup

When?
Monday, October 22 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Tony Harcup

What's the talk about?

Tony Harcup will draw on his experience as a journalist and as a journalism academic to explore the good, the bad and the ugly of news reporting. At a time when the traditional journalism industries are under existential threat, yet stories whiz around us all the time, his talk will focus on the enduring value of properly researched news.

Tony currently teaches journalism studies at the University of Sheffield and is the author of the Oxford Dictionary of Journalism. Before moving into higher education he worked as a staff and freelance journalist in both alternative and mainstream media, mostly in Yorkshire. His research interests include news values, alternative journalism and ethics, and his book Journalism: Principles and Practice has been translated into several languages including Chinese, Polish and Korean.

Kate Davison

When?
Monday, September 24 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Kate Davison

What's the talk about?

What can historians learn from old jokes? They might not be the most obvious subject of academic inquiry, but in recent years the history of humour has become a vibrant field of research. If you take Aristotle’s word for it, laughter is fundamental to human experience - people have always laughed; yet, the things we think it acceptable to laugh at, and how that laughter is thought about, tolerated or suppressed, have varied considerably with time, place and culture. This has compelling possibilities for historians. The talk will use the example of eighteenth-century Britain - a period brimming with bawdy jest books and a surfeit of satirical texts and images - to consider what the laughter of the past can tell us about the sensibilities, values and interests of those who lived through it.

Kate Davison has been a lecturer in the History Department at the University of Sheffield since 2017; before that she taught at the University of Oxford, and carried out her own research and study at the universities of Cambridge, Exeter and Sheffield. Her work focuses in particular on Britain c.1650-1800 and this talk will draw on material from the book she is currently working on.

Juliet Wakefield

When?
Monday, August 20 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Juliet Wakefield

What's the talk about?

PLEASE NOTE THIS TALK IS ON THE 3RD MONDAY OF THE MONTH INSTEAD OF THE 4TH

We are constantly told by the media and health professionals that we should stop smoking, drink less, get our '5 a day' and exercise regularly. But how often are we told about the importance of our social life? Lacking important social groups can be as bad for us as smoking, yet it is an aspect of our heath that we so rarely consider. In this talk Dr. Juliet Wakefield will discuss the idea of the 'Social Cure', present some of her own research on the topic, and consider how we can unlock its positive effects in our own lives .

Juliet Wakefield is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Nottingham Trent University. Her research focuses on the impact of group memberships on people's everyday lives. In addition to exploring the impact of groups on health and wellbeing, she investigates intergroup / intragroup helping and help-seeking, gender identity, national identity, and online identities.

George Thomas

When?
Monday, July 23 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
George Thomas

What's the talk about?

George will talk about the identification, prevalence and presentation of autism illustrated by stories from his own experience. We can consider the controversies: deficient or different? Nature or nurture? We will look at successful people with autism and consider what life is like for many.

George worked in autism education between the years of 1996 and 2016. He has worked in schools and with Local Authorities in an advisory capacity within Leicester City and Leicestershire, representing the interests of parent and children with autism in many different forums and in schools around the country. Towards the close of his work with Leicestershire LA, George became interested in developing provision for children who were either excluded from school or unable to attend by virtue of their anxiety. He set up an ‘education otherwise than at school’ programme to help the authority meet its responsibilities to this vulnerable group. Since 2001, George has been a Regional Tutor on the autism courses provided by the University of Birmingham. In 2013 he retired from his post as Service manager of Leicestershire’s Autism Outreach Service to develop his own consultancy providing training in Autism throughout the country.

Anthony Warner

When?
Monday, June 25 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Anthony Warner

What's the talk about?

Anthony Warner somehow managed to complete a Biochemistry Degree at Manchester University before deeply disappointing his parents by deciding that the heat of the professional kitchen was the career for him. After ten years in restaurants, hotels and events-catering he became a development chef in the food manufacturing industry and has spent the last 11 years working on some of the UK’s best-known brands and products.

In 2016, driven by frustration at the clearly unscientific messages being spewed out by a new breed of healthy eating celebrities, he started the Angry Chef blog, intended to appeal to a few similarly frustrated food industry professionals. Despite frequent attempts to alienate his readers, the blog has grown in popularity, forcing a middle-aged man to reluctantly engage with social media. Terrified at the prospect of being described as a ‘food-blogger’, Anthony has tried in vain to keep Angry Chef anonymous, but has sadly failed to do so as newspapers and magazines continue to approach him in the hope he might say something controversial about Jamie Oliver.

He now writes regularly for New Scientist, The Pool and the Sunday Times, and his first book, The Angry Chef - Bad Science and the Truth about Healthy Eating was published by Oneworld in July. He has appeared on Inside Science, The Food Programme and was once asked if he would be happy to eat his own dog on The Moral Maze.

Anthony does not have a food philosophy. He is a pretty decent cook, but is not an expert in anything. He is merely curious and determined to get to the truth. He loves food, loves science and is ambivalent about Marmite. He lives in the Nottinghamshire countryside with his wife, daughter and a slightly unbalanced Springer Spaniel.

Michael Granville

When?
Monday, May 21 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Michael Granville

What's the talk about?

Mike Granville was educated and brought up entirely in the Catholic tradition. He attended a primary school run by nuns and a secondary school run by De la Salle brothers. At that time, the church paid most (about 85%) of the cost of running the schools. That has changed and faith schools are now fully funded by the state.

Now a Secular-Humanist Mike Granville campaigns for an end to state funding of Faith Schools.

The government has channelled increasing funds to faith schools over the last twenty years. This continues despite the continued decline in church attendance. Mike will look at figures and see how the law has been set up to support an openly discriminatory system in school admissions.

Philip Moriarty

When?
Monday, April 23 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Philip Moriarty

What's the talk about?

There is no doubt that quantum physics embodies mind-blowing concepts that force us the question the very nature of reality. And if there’s a contender for our current best “theory of everything” then quantum mechanics wins hands down.

But, far too often, the word “quantum” signals the worst type of vacuous pseudoscientific gobbledegook. It’s exploited by those who are entirely clueless about the underlying physics — or, worse, should know better — to evoke a misplaced mysticism about the ‘holistic’ nature of the universe. Moreover, when consciousness and quantum collide, the nonsense factor goes through the roof…

Philip Moriarty will aim to tease out the science from the mysticism and show that while quantum physics certainly has its weird and wacky aspects, it’s at heart a theory of waves. That means we can very often easily interpret what’s happening at the quantum level in terms of the everyday world around us – he’ll take a look at what coffee cups, drums, and a SlinkyTM can tell us about the broader nature of the universe (and Deepak Chopra’s place in it).

Philip Moriarty is a professor of physics at the University of Nottingham.

Barry Gibson

When?
Monday, March 26 2018 at 7:30PM

Download iCalendar file
(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

Farm Road
Sheffield
South Yorkshire S2 2TP

(Press the buzzer to be let in. We are in the back room of the Club.)

Who?
Barry Gibson

What's the talk about?

The talk will focus on whether or not we can conceive of oral health as a life course project. The talk will look at data taken from qualitative interviews with older people exploring the significance of the mouth and oral health in older age. We will also explore when it became possible to conceive of being able to keep one's teeth into older age and what the consequences might be for society. If this project were to be recognised what might the implications be for health and social policy?

Professor Barry Gibson is a sociologist who has spent the last twenty years working in dentistry. He teaches sociology to dental students and writes about oral health, dentistry and society. He spends most of his time outside of work walking his dog, going to the cinema and listening to podcasts. He would like to be better at photography but well you know.